Tips on Constructing A Plan After Graduation

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In this wonderful world that we live in, there are often many options for us to choose from. Although this is liberating and amazing in many ways, there is still a large amount of confusion associated with having so many possibilities. With the end of your degree just around the corner, there is a pretty general and rational sense of “What now?”.

This is the place that I am in. Speaking from experience, the only thing that gives me a sense of peace is having a well thought out plan.

I’m currently in my last year of a psychology degree, and I think I’d be a good fit for law school. So my plan is to take a year off to develop myself into a well-rounded and attractive candidate for future jobs and schools. I intend to work, ace my courses, and get involved with some extracurriculars to help get me into law school and to pay for it. I also have some hobbies and giving back that I’d like to do, like volunteering with ESL international students and playing competitive sports.

For those who are also wondering what they should do at this stage in their schooling, the best advice I can offer is to create a plan of your own. You may be surprised at how calming it is and how focused you feel once you have direction. Below are some good points to consider when making this plan.

Constructing your own plan

1. Ask yourself how far into the future you want to plan for

Are you intending on planning for retirement, or your first job? A general time frame is a good place to start with when considering your plan for after school.

2. Remember to be flexible

Flexibility in a plan allows for a change and an easy transition into unexpected moments. However, being very specific allows for focus.Find the balance! Everybody should know what they want, but sometimes, there’s more than one way to achieve what you want to. Be easy-going but focused.

3. What can you do to develop your skills considering the time frame you have?

Maybe you’re studying foreign languages but want to apply to be an engineer after graduation. There’s a good chance you’ll need to go back to school for engineering to achieve this. So consider what options you have available or what you need to enhance!

4. How is your attitude?

Henry Ford spoke the truth when he said “whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right”.

5. How well do you deal with stress?

Although it’s nice to reach for the stars, certain people deal with difficult situations better than others.

We hope that these tips give you a starting point to help navigate your transition from student life to new grad… Any change is difficult, and being asked about your plans, goals or career aspirations by family and friends can make it seem even more stressful.. However, with a clear plan, you can set yourself up for success and even enjoy the process!

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About the author

Matthew Mullins is entering his final semester of an undergraduate degree in psychology at Brock University. Matthew is also an aspiring lawyer. He is interested in health, the environment, politics and travel and various sports such as soccer, hiking, yoga, rowing, tennis, skiing, snowboarding (and many more). He recently returned from a 5 month exchange in Switzerland where he had the opportunity to immerse himself in Swiss culture, language, etc., while also being able to travel around other European countries.