Six Essential Skills Employers Want to See on Your Resume

by

The questions we ask ourselves when fine-tuning our resume usually go like this: What makes me a valuable candidate for this job? What is it I have to offer? How can I demonstrate that in as few words as possible? What often sets ideal and weak applicants apart is their versatile skill set. Employers sifting through a stack of resumes looking for someone with skills that they believe are vital to the success of their organization. This begs the question: are there skills which today’s employers generally seek when hiring? While specific qualifications are unique to the position and organization, here are six workplace skills which you ought to consider adding to your resume.

Communication

It’s not surprising that communication is first on our list considering how interconnected we are with each other on multiple platforms. Communication comes in many forms in the workplace. Being able to articulate a professional issue to your boss, writing a business email or interacting with a customer all amount to how well you communicate. Learning to mean what you say and say what you mean is vital to the functionality of any work environment.

Teamwork

Placing teamwork as one of your skills may sound overly broad, however, this skill translates to a number of desired qualities. Teamwork can relate to specific skills such as the ability to mediate interpersonal/professional conflict, accommodating the needs of fellow colleagues or working effectively with others towards a collective goal. We work with people who inevitably possess different ideas about how to reach the same goal. Working as a team allows each employee to have input and share the workload. This maximizes efficiency and fairness while minimizing the prevalence of conflict. Even if you’ve worked at only one job, you’ve learned more about teamwork than you realize. It’s a common yet endlessly sought-after skill.

Adaptability

Highlighting adaptability on your resume can make you a better applicant. With all the rapid changes taking place within job markets, being capable of adapting to the deviation is an asset. With prolonged time, employees can become too comfortable with the routine of completing their work. Employers want to hire people who can learn the new and unlearn the old. Whether it’s a new operating system, a tricky filing procedure or even internal updates to the company’s HR policy. If you are eager and willing to learn, you will thrive in any position.

Leadership

We tend to characterize the trait of leadership as a formidable skill possessed by managers or high authority figures. It’s regarded as a skill practiced only by the chosen few. As made evident in this inspiring Ted Talk, everyone practices leadership throughout the course of their lives. Workplace leadership comes in overt forms like managing a company or being a lead on a project, however, the skill is utilized in more subtle ways. You can show leadership by taking initiative, speaking up in meetings, helping others within your workplace. Although you may not be applying to be the next CEO, placing leadership as one of your skills demonstrates that you are not afraid of helping or leading co-workers when the situation arises.

Ability to Problem Solve

Whether you catch someone drinking out of your office mug or you discover a missing detail in a financial report, the ability to solve complex and basic problems is a crucial skill in any occupation. Work problems come in all shapes and sizes. What may be a problem for you may not be a problem for the next colleague, and vice versa. It all amounts to how you as an employee go about solving any conflict. Employers crave people who can identify the key issue and take the initiative to find a solution, rather than becoming negatively caught up in the problem itself. Employers will forever be searching your resume for this skill. Problem solving is necessary in every workplace.

Time Management

People are busier today with devices going off, families to care for, and not to mention maintaining physical and mental well being. The forty-hour workweek can make this balancing act difficult, but it can be achieved nonetheless. Listing time management as one of your unique skills demonstrates that you can foster control of your time and energy amidst numerous responsibilities. This is useful when it comes to working on multiple job initiatives, meeting deadlines or even simply being on time every day. Time is crucial for any effective work environment. Employers want their workers to make the most of it.

Landing any job begins with the quality of your resume. One of the key components being the skills we choose to highlight. Select a skill set that you both confidently possess and have devoted time to practice. Always make sure to update your skill set as well, after all, we never stop learning! The next time you’re giving yourself a pep talk before an interview, remember that these skills are always at your disposal. For more tips on landing your next job, explore our incubator!

Share
About the author

Quentin Stuckey Quentin Stuckey is studying English with a minor in Radio & Television Arts at Ryerson University. His past writing experience includes poetry, plays and articles for “The Plaid Zebra” online magazine. He hopes to pursue a career in television writing following the completion of his degree. He is originally from the town of Alliston, Ontario and currently lives in Toronto.