The Government’s Aboriginal Student Employment Program Builds Basics for Forestry Careers

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Like co-op programs and internships, working in your desired field is very important to gain industry experience. But what if you’re an Aboriginal student looking for opportunities in forestry? Take a look into the Canadian Forest Service Aboriginal Student Employment Program offered through Natural Resources Canada:

What kind of experience does the program offer?

Student jobs can include anything from scientific, to technical, or labour work specifically for aboriginal students. According to Natural Resources Canada, students may find themselves doing field work that educates them about plant identities, differentiating ecosystems, and more.

Other examples include:

  • Operating field science equipment
  • Economic analysis, social analysis, and reporting
  • Soil and water sampling
  • Basics of sustainable forest management
  • Education on animal habitats and species at risk

Students gain valuable hands-on experience and learn new things everyday. These experiences provide a foundation for a number of different career paths.

How do I apply?

If you’re a high school or post-secondary student, you’re in luck! The program is exclusively for students who apply for the Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP). Further aboriginal identification steps can be found here.

How many people are hired?

Between April 2014-March 2015, only about ten students will be accepted into the program. Make sure you reach application deadlines and review your resumes as soon as possible. TalentEgg has plenty of resume and cover letter tips to get you started!

Read our Aboriginal Career Guide for more tips!

Sources: Canadian Forest Service Aboriginal Student Employment ProgramFederal Student Work Experience Program
Photo credit: Niels Mickers on Flickr

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About the author

Jessica Cruz 's scattered thoughts, ideas and quirky comics travel from her mind to paper. She enjoys narrative writing, graphic design, outdoor sports, and occasionally defeating virtual zombies. Her final year at the University of Toronto Mississauga and Sheridan College (joint program) lands a double major in Communication, Culture & Information Technology (CCIT) and Professional Writing. She faces a career quest in the realm of marketing, design, writing, and web. Find her on Twitter or LinkedIn.