York University Student Vanessa Hojda Explains The Nicolas Cage Photo Email

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Most job seekers don’t tweet out their job applications, but York University psychology student Vanessa Hojda had something to share.

After composing an email to apply for a job at the university, Vanessa attached her resume and confidently clicked ‘send’.

However, what she thought was a resume turned out to be a rather off-putting photo of Nicolas Cage (pictured right).

“If a future employer looks up my name, I just hope they have a sense of humour.” —Vanessa Hojda, York University psychology student

Although she didn’t get the job, she did manage to achieve an abundance of unexpected fame. By posting this mishap on her Twitter and Tumblr accounts, Vanessa figured it would be a good laugh for her friends:

“I ACCIDENTALLY SENT MY POTENTIAL FUTURE BOSS A PICTURE OF NIC CAGE RATHER THAN MY COVER LETTER+RESUME, WHICH WAS A ZIP FILE TITLED WITH A BUNCH OF NUMBERS LIKE THE JPG I ACCIDENTALLY ATTACHED OH MY GOD”

Little did she know that she and Nicolas Cage were about to go viral.

After getting picked up by Gawker, The Huffington Post and Yahoo!, The Washington Post and Toronto Star were not far behind. “I always wonder how these things get popular for no reason,” she says, in response to all this media attention.

The initial surprise at her newfound fame was quickly followed by wariness as she began to receive quite a bit of negative backlash. “People post comments like ‘oh yawn’ or ‘must be a slow news day today’,” she says, “and to an extent, I agree with them. Why is this as big as it is?”

That being said, the flip side of this scenario has been amazing. “I mean, I’m in the paper! I’m being invited to TV studios! It’s going to be great and I’m just enjoying the ride for now.”

Hold up.

The question that has been on everyone’s minds: why did she have this picture of Nicolas Cage saved on her desktop in the first place? “I blog a lot and follow blogs with funny pictures. I save pictures I find particularly funny since they might be of use later for some reason,” she says.

I’m guessing this isn’t quite the use she had in mind.

Vanessa has received some job offers from the blow-up of this situation, as her sense of humour and Internet-saavy skills have definitely been highlighted. When asked if she foresees any negative reprecussions now that her name is so searchable online, she claimed that she couldn’t see why. “If a future employer looks up my name, I just hope they have a sense of humour. That’s the whole reason I posted it in the first place.”

Someone else with a sense of humour? Her dad.

Leaving her dad to discover the whole situation in The Washington Post, she received a call from him saying he thought it was hilarious and was happy this was all happening to her. “If you end up getting a call from Tom Cruise through all this and find out he’s looking for me, tell him I’m at work and I’ll get back to him,” he told her.

Vanessa left us with some advice she’s gained through this whole experience: Organize your computer files properly. “If it’s any consolation to those worried about my organizational skills, I’ll have it known that I have now renamed my resume to ‘ThisIsReallyNotAPictureOfNicolasCageItsAResumeYouDumbass’,” she said.

This type of filename might be taking it to the extreme, but after this Nic Cage ordeal, extreme might be necessary.

How would you deal with a job hunting mishap like this? Tell us in the comments section below!

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