Gen Y unemployment decreased slightly in April, says Stats Can

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Statistics Canada released new data on Friday indicating that employment for 15-to 24-year-olds increased by 23,000 jobs last month.

Gen Y employment increased by 0.5% in April, resulting in an employment rate of 55.4% overall.

Youth in Alberta benefited from the greatest gains last month with a 1.6% increase in employment, while those in Saskatchewan yielded the highest youth employment rate, at 63.3%.

Are you still looking for a job for the summer or after graduation?  We’ve got lots of useful tips for you at TalentEgg!

Networking

Networking is a skill that is very under-utilized by Gen Y.  You never know what connections and possible job opportunities are available from the people you know.  Worried about sounding awkward?  Check out these handy tips:

Resumés

Your resumé, like your cover letter should be catered to the position you are applying to.    The more information you can provide about the job you are applying to, the better.  Check out these articles for more tips:

Cover letters

All applications should include a unique cover letter.  Why?  Well, because it shows you have put some research into your application.  Check out some tips from the TalentEgg writing team:

Interviews

Having good interview skills increases your likelihood at landing a great job.   Conduct mock interviews with people you know to help improve your existing skills as well as help you practice for upcoming interviews.  Check out these articles with tips on interviewing:

Don’t forget to check out the career-launching roles on TalentEgg!  We’re still posting summer jobs as well as tons of great entry-level positions every day!

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About the author

Danielle Lorenz is a long-time contributor to the Career Incubator. Danielle is a PhD student in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Alberta. When procrastinating from schoolwork, you will find Danielle lurking on several social media platforms and trying to befriend the snowshoe hares on the U of A campus.